Peer-reviewed research helps public sector managers to make informed decisions on policy so they can best manage the complex needs of today’s public service to deliver maximum value to citizens. 

Designed for public sector decision-makers, ANZSOG’s peer-reviewed journal Evidence Base publishes systematic reviews of the evidence in specific policy areas with a sharp focus on ‘what works’.

ANZSOG's commitment to providing value for stakeholders means the journal is open access under Creative Commons License 4.0.

Visit the journal's website

Our editors

Managing editor: George Argyrous, ANZSOG Senior Lecturer in Evidence Based Policy Making, UNSW.

Assistant editor: Sophie Yates, ANZSOG.

Information for authors

Evidence Base pays AUD$10,000 in instalments to successful applicants. Proposals are vetted by an Editorial Board of practitioners and academics. Reviews must focus on two aspects of research:

1. An issue of importance to public sector decision-makers. Examples might be ‘the effectiveness of performance measures in improving education’, or ‘factors that improve health outcomes in Indigenous communities’.

2. The empirical base of research in the area.

Evidence Base publishes reviews of the evidence informing decision-making in specific policy
areas.

Reviews in this journal must cover the following:

  1. An issue of demonstrable importance to public sector decision-makers. Examples might be
    ‘the effectiveness of performance measures in improving education’, or ‘factors that improve
    health outcomes in Indigenous communities’.

  2. The empirical base of research in the area. The focus must be on the nature of the evidence
    gathered around the issue and the conclusions about policy that derive from this evidence. It
    is not an avenue for publishing original research, nor a review of theoretical debates. Specific
    issues for review may include methods of data collection, methods of data analysis, and the
    definition of key concepts. We use the term 'empirical' broadly: reviews should not
    necessarily be limited to purely quantitative studies, nor to the results of experimental trials.

Reviews primarily draw on the Australian and New Zealand research base, but also on
international studies where relevant to Australian and New Zealand policy practice.

A key factor determining whether a proposal will be selected is whether there is a sufficient
base of evidence, particularly from Australia and New Zealand, to justify a review. Before
submitting a proposal, authors will need to undertake a preliminary literature search and list
the key empirical references from Australia and New Zealand they discover in the relevant
area of the proposal form.

We are also particularly interested in proposals that meet ANZSOG's research priorities. These
are:

- Collaborative governance and interface between sectors: This includes commissioning, coproduction,
outsourcing, NGO partnerships etc., including between the public, private and
‘third’ sectors.

- Cross-jurisdictional policymaking.

- Digital leadership and disruptive technology.

The reviews will be 5000-8000 words in length and will be supported by an AUD$10,000
competitive grant to help with the research needed to write the review. Note that the grant
cannot be used for the purchase of infrastructure or equipment.